Shem reaches for a miracle in Ep. 13 (Part 2)

The action turns grim in “Milhamah” Episode 13 (Part 2), and it’s up to Etgar (and maybe a miracle) to save the day!

Etgar throws the Dalet toward Shem.Shem struggles with doubt as he is drowning.A fish (made up of fish) delivers a miracle.

After Deli’s geyser blast hit Shem in the last scene, Etgar tosses Shem a life preserver — the Dalet foundational glyph. The glyph can alter reality through the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, and a legend says its origins date back to God’s creation of the world.

But will it save a doubting protagonist like Shem? Only with the help of a mysterious fish (which is composed of other fish). Where did this helper come from, and why did it deliver the Dalet to a drowning Shem? The answer is unclear, but for now let’s call it a miracle.

At the end, Shem musters up enough faith and hope to make a prayer — a form of reality-altering speech that differs from the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, or Deli’s twisted magic.  But time will tell whether divine intervention will come through…

Updates

Look forward to the next “Milhamah” scene, which should be released in a week or two! Also, I’m working on an Indiegogo campaign that I hope to have ready in July.

In addition, the Michigan Comic Con in Detroit is not too far away, so I hope to wrap up an Issue #2 by the end of July. So the upcoming month should be a busy one!

Metro Detroit stores are now selling ‘Milhamah’

If you didn’t get a print copy of “Milhamah: Fighting Words” Issue #1 — sure to be a collector’s item! — at the Motor City Comic Con, you can now buy it at several stores.

If you live in the metro Detroit area, the following stores now carry copies:

Look forward to additional stores carrying “Milhamah” soon. In the meantime, people outside the metro Detroit area can buy “Milhamah” at my Storenvy store.

New updates to the “Milhamah” story are coming next week. Keep following for more updates!

 

Motor City Comic Con was a success!

May 17-19 was the 2019 Motor City Comic Con, and Aksanyah Studios was there to sell print comics of Issue #1 of “Milhamah: Fighting Words”!

Issue #1 follows the adventures of Shem ‘Etzem (the noun), Tiqwah Tawit (the article) and Etgar Toar (the adjective) — three linguistic warriors of the Holy Tongue Society. The new print edition contains remastered pages and additional exposition not found in the webcomic.

While at the comic con, I sold 33 copies of the comic, or about one-third of my first print run. Some stickers and prints sold too.

From here, I look forward to making the comic available in metro Detroit comic book shops. The goal is to get back to work on finishing the current story arc and proceeding to the next one while producing enough content for an Issue #2. An Indiegogo or Kickstarter campaign could fund a large-scale print of #1 and #2, plus the UPC codes that will let the comics be sold by national retailers.

I apologize for the lull in new “Milhamah” content, but much more will be on the way in June!

Episode 11: Slaughter in the Water (Pt. 1)

This new episode’s first part isn’t exactly a slaughter, but good and evil go at it for another round. The last time “Milhamah: Fighting Words” had this much fighting between Shem and Deli, Shem took a walloping. Check and see what happens here…

Shem returns to battle.Shem fires an "osteoblast" of bone shards.Deli deflects the attack.Plan B looks a lot like Plan A.

Action scenes always take more time to design than talking head panels, but the end result is often satisfying. This time I tried to make things more dynamic by breaking the panel’s perspective with Shem’s “osteoblast” bone shard missiles.

I also added more sound effects and used the negative space outside the panels to contribute to the storytelling. I’ll probably do that more, especially in my remastered print edition. The goal is to begin selling copies in April with a couple of comic cons on the horizon!

Storywise, while Shem’s limited attack moves are a punchline here, I look forward to giving him more to work with in the scenes to come. Plus we need to see what Etgar and Tiqwah are doing in Episode 11 Part 2!

In other news…

Just a reminder: You can also see “Milhamah” comics on Tapas and Webtoon. I’m trying to grow those subscriber bases, so if you use those sites, you can get automatic notifications when new episodes come along.

Also, you can vote for “Milhamah” on the Top Webcomics page site, which draws a lot of webcomic fans. I’ll be promoting this more in the near future. Help this series climb the ranks!

Grammar Part 3: Hebrew history

A screenshot of the Aqademyah's like of my praise for their services, which included a link to this site.
The Aqademyah likes me! They really like me!

 

After learning about Semitic languages in November, our journey through the Joüon and Muraoka book continues. This time we’re going specifically through the history of ancient Hebrew.

Biblical Hebrew is fairly consistent throughout the centuries. The Bible’s writers, from earliest to latest, differ most in vocabulary. Some of the syntax also evolves, though it’s not that significant. Morphology, or word formation, changed the least due to stable consonants.

However, Joüon and Muraoka point out that the following Mishnaic Hebrew era strays farther from the biblical style conventions. However, they speculate that some Mishnaic-era writers still wanted to write in the Bible’s older style and format.

And they say Mishnaic Hebrew started to form after most of the Tanakh (Old Testament) was finished. The Mishnaic era also covers the period of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Jesus. 

Joüon and Muraoka divide the biblical language into two eras: a “golden age” before the Babylonian exile and an era afterward. The authors acknowledge that some scholars think the entire Bible was basically written after the exile. But Joüon and Muraoka point out linguistic differences, such as the Bible’s later books spelling “Jerusalem” and “David” in a way earlier biblical books didn’t.

Hebrew’s relationship to ‘Milhamah’

The “Milhamah” webcomic doesn’t glean too much from this history. However, the character of ‘Aravah ‘Ivrit, whom I unveiled last week for Hebrew Language Day, embodies the language. Some of the details are in that post.

My art drew quite a few people from Facebook to this website. I even earned a Facebook like from the Academy of the Hebrew Language, which chiefly promotes the holiday in honor of Hebrew revivalist Eliezer Ben-Yehuda. Their resources are a great help to my comic research, and I let them know that. 

All in all, it’s not a bad way to end the year!